Exfoliating alpha and beta hydroxy acids meet nourishing passionfruit extract in this dual-purpose cream. At work in the moisturizing department? Hyaluronic acid. "Hyaluronic acid is a humectant, meaning it draws water to the skin," says Emily Arch, M.D., a dermatologist at Dermatology + Aesthetics in Chicago. It then holds onto that moisture instantly—yes, the effects are immediate—making skin look and feel more hydrated and plump. Gentle enough to use every night, it works equally well on normal, dry, oily, or combination skin types (since hyaluronic acid is deeply hydrating yet still lightweight enough that it won't feel greasy).
I asked that very question of celebrity facialist and dermarolling proponent Kerry Benjamin only a few weeks ago, after it occurred to me that I wasn’t satisfied with my own explanation of “Uh, I think it boosts your collagen by making tiny micro-injuries in the skin.” I wasn’t wrong, but it was so unbelievably simplistic that even after months of putting it into practice, I was still half-convinced that there was dark magic involved. Not quite. “Basically, the skin around your eyes is very thin and delicate,” Benjamin explained as she pressed a roller into my face. “When you see dark circles, you’re actually just seeing the blood pool around your eyes through the skin. By microneedling and making those tiny injuries in the skin, you’re putting collagen production into overdrive and literally thickening that skin.” Doing so makes the blood much less visible and fills in those bags and lines, too.
A type of eyelid surgery called blepharoplasty may help eliminate bags under the eyes, depending on their cause. During this outpatient procedure, the eye surgeon creates an incision under the lashes or inside the lower lid. The surgeon removes excess fat through the incision and sometimes removes extra skin, then closes the incisions with tiny stitches.
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) classifies creams and lotions as cosmetics, which are defined as having no medical value. So the FDA regulates them less strictly than it does drugs. This means that cosmetic products don't undergo the same rigorous testing for safety and effectiveness that topically applied medications undergo. Regarding this category of creams and lotions, the FDA's main concern is safety, not effectiveness.
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