There are different kinds of retinoids, and they vary in strength. As cosmetic chemist Kevin Gallagher explained, this strength comes with a trade-off: the stronger the retinoid, the faster it works — and the harsher it is on skin. The strongest retinoids are only available with a prescription. But that’s not to say over-the-counter formulations are ineffective. A three-month, double-blind, randomized study of 34 women showed there was no significant difference in efficacy between an over-the-counter 1.1 percent retinol cream and 0.025 percent prescription tretinoin. In short: Retinoids work.
Peptides are the star of the show here, namely an amino-peptide complex, that penetrates 10 layers deep to help skin cells. "Peptides act as signaling mechanisms that tell the body to produce more collagen," says Dhaval Bhanusali, M.D., a dermatologist based in New York City. (As a reminder, collagen is the protein responsible for strong, firm, youthful skin, so more collagen equals fewer wrinkles. But this cream doesn't stop there; it also gently exfoliates and hydrates.
As you age, the tissue structures and muscles supporting your eyelids weaken. The skin may start to sag, and fat that is normally confined to the area around the eye (orbit) can move into the area below your eyes. Also, the space below your eyes can accumulate fluid, making the under-eye area appear puffy or swollen. Several factors cause or worsen this effect, including:
“Brands can’t just ship the same things over and over and expect to ride the coattails of this subscription success trend either,” Tzuo said. “In addition to demanding immediate, ongoing fulfillment, customers today want to be happily surprised on a regular basis. And if brands don’t meet those expectations, they get dropped, not to mention trashed on social media. It’s that simple.”
Amazon had some sort of sale so I signed for a few subscriptions to see if anything was worth it. After the first month, the only one I kept was Allure. I'm a serious skincare person and a terrible make-up person but the box had a nice blend of both -- enough make-up for me to play with and some good skincare stuff/brands I hadn't seen. The second month I got an envelope in the mail and it's a single Kat Von D lipliner -- I'm not a fan of her make-up line and thought 'yep, this is it, subscription boxes suck' and canceled. Tonight, I got home and there's a proper box with some great make-up and two different face oils to try (and seriously, no joke, I was googling face oils today). So I signed back up and am now writing this review.
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